A Travellerspoint blog

Botswana Day 4: Lion Love at Lagoon

Our three nights at Tau Pan in the Kalahari were up so it was time to move on to Northern Botswana. We were staying two nights at Lagoon Camp, on the border of Botswana and Namibia. Because we had a plane to catch, we got to sleep in a bit until 7a. This caused us to miss the dominant male and a lioness who were seen at the waterhole that morning. But it did allow us to have a huge breakfast of eggs, sausage, bacon, and toast, as well as do a little shopping in the camp gift shop. Our flight was at 10a so we left for the air strip shortly after.

Our pilot this morning was Jacob from Poland.
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Leaving Tau Pan.
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Taking a little bit of sunburn from the Kalahari.
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We made a quick stop at Nxai Pan, a Kwando camp we did not visit, to drop off our two Swiss friends. We would see them later in the trip. We then landed at Maun to drop off a guide for a doctor's appointment and to pick up some freight and a new passenger. Finally, we arrived at Lagoon Camp about 1:30p. We were met at the air strip by our guide, Carlos, and tracker, Timo. We headed to camp to check in.

Elephants on the way.
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We arrived at camp and were shown to our tent, right on the lagoon.
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We had a little time before our game drive to relax on the porch and watch the elephants bathing in the lagoon out front.
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Our game drive began at 4p and our fellow passengers were John, a travel agent from Reef & Rainforest, and Louie, an annoying know-it-all who liked to tell us about everywhere he had been including Antarctica.

Our first sighting was the impala.
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And lots of baboons.
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Lilac-breasted roller.
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Then we came upon these two guys, lazing around in the road. We had to turn around as they wouldn't budge.
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This one was lying around like men everywhere do.
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As usual, I spent the afternoon trying to stay out of the sun.
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As the light started to fade, we sighted a lion mating couple, taking a break.
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The break didn't last long and they were back at it.
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Then they spotted something.
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An uninvited lioness was approaching.
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This did not sit well with the male and he let her know with a roar and charge.
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It seemed to be all bluster though as they all settled down.
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After this excitement we stopped for sundowners.
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On our way back to camp we saw a civet, another rare safari sighting. Unfortunately, no one was prepared with a camera.

We arrived back at night. In the Kalahari, no night driving was allowed but this was a private concession owned by Kwando which meant we could stay out later. Dinner was a beef filet with gravy, rice, and veggies. After dinner we had some drinks around the fire with Carlos then headed to bed around midnight.

Posted by zihuatcat 17:14 Archived in Botswana Tagged africa mike botswana Comments (0)

Botswana Day 3: Lions for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner

Another early start today, rising at 5:30a. This morning, however, there were LIONS. Standing in the outside shower of our tent, we watched the dominant male of the Tau Pan pride drinking from the waterhole for about 20 minutes.

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The dominant male headed our way and walked right between our tent and the tent next door. About that time, Vasco came to our tent to escort us to breakfast. He told us then that there were five intruder males headed toward camp. They had come to drive out the Tau Pan dominant male. This is most likely why we hadn't seen any lions yet. The females were off in hiding with their cubs because during a takeover, the new males sometimes kill the cubs of the prior male in order to send the females into heat. We arrived at the main tent for breakfast and could see the five lions making their way towards us, roaring and marking along the way. Hearing the sounds they made was chilling and exhilarating at the same time.

I thought back to the dominant male we had just seen a few minutes prior and felt sadness for him. He was at the end of his reign as there is no way for him to fight off that many intruders. He will have to move on by himself. These are the things about safari that are difficult for me.

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No one was interested in breakfast. After they walked thru, we jumped in the vehicles to follow. They were headed to the camp waterhole.

Camp in the background.
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At the watering hole, they continued their spraying and roaring, in between sips of water, of course.

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We watched this display for about an hour before they moved on and we returned to camp. We didn't stay long as we had a long day ahead. We were headed to Deception Valley, the area made famous by the book, Cry of the Kalahari. The animal spotting continued on our way.

Mongoose.
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Kudu.
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Oryx.
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Almost there.
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Black-backed jackal.
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More oryx. They were everywhere in the Kalahari.
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The road in the middle of nowhere.
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We stopped for lunch at a rest stop, with an actual bathroom, around 11:30a. It was still early but we were really suffering in the heat. Our lunch and drinks were kept in the "cooler box," an ice chest that plugged into the vehicle. Let's just say it was so hot that there was nothing cool coming out of that box. But we had a nice lunch of baked chicken, bean salad, pasta salad, fruit, cheese, and lukewarm drinks.

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The toilet seat was so hot I had to crouch on top of it to go to the bathroom.
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Just after lunch, Souper spotted a lion trying to escape the heat under a tree.
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Kori bustard.
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Springbok, the common antelope of the Kalahari. Each region of Africa has a common antelope. In Tanzania, it was impalas.
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We also visited the "lake" or at least what was left of it.
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Giraffe.
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Oryx grabbing the only bit of shade he can find.
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Kudu and a jackal as well. The animals find shade where they can in this part of Botswana.
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Oryx with babies.
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Ostrich.
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Our day was capped off with a sighting of five honey badgers, a pretty rare animal that many people never see on safari.
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We finally made it back to camp around 7p--very hot, very tired, and very dusty. A dinner of tomato cheese tartlet, chicken tarragon, brown rice, and ginger peas and carrots was served at the usual time. During our dessert of chocolate pear, the lions returned to the vicinity. They bid us good night with their roars.

Posted by zihuatcat 15:47 Archived in Botswana Comments (0)

Botswana Day 2: Kudu Tell Us Where the Lions Are?

Wake up at Tau Pan was 5:30a and a breakfast of muffins and fruit was served at the main building at 6a.

View of waterhole from camp.
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Camp manager, Vasco (same name as our guide).
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By 6:45a, we were tracking leopard and lion that had been thru camp some time during the night.
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Unfortunately, we didn't find them. We found a few other animals around.

Giraffe.
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Souper with an oryx skull.
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Mom and Dad spotted eagle owl with chicks.
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Kudu herd.
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Vulture.
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Yellow-billed hornbill.
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Vasco and Souper tracking on foot.
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More Kudu.
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Springbok.
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Black-backed jackals.
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Mongoose.
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Steenbok.
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Termite mound.
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Around 11a we went back to camp for lunch of beef kebabs, potato salad, green beans, and fruit. It was devastatingly hot during this period of the day so we spent our time lazing around the main building, watching the waterhole, catching up the travel journal, and downloading pictures.

Warthog at the waterhole.
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Giraffe at the waterhole.
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Afternoon snacks of samosas and chocolate cake were served at 4p and then we headed out for the afternoon game drive. It was another fairly uneventful drive.

Yellow-billed hornbill.
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Picked over skeleton.
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Oryx.
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Black-backed jackal with adorable jackal pups.
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Leopard tortoise.
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We stopped for the obligatory sundowner drinks then it was back to the camp for dinner of chickpea coriander soup, beef roast, bob with tomato sauce, sliced squash, purple beans, and dessert. We were up late deciding on the next day's plans to drive to Deception Valley.

Posted by zihuatcat 16:19 Archived in Botswana Tagged africa mike botswana Comments (0)

Botswana Day 1: Small Planes and Small Creatures

We landed safely in Johannesburg about 5a local time and had roughly six hours to kill before our next flight to Maun, Botswana. But there were things to do. First up, of course, was getting thru Immigration, picking up our luggage, and then Customs. This process took a while but wasn't too bad. We then had to rearrange our baggage as a representative from the African Rock Hotel was supposed to meet us to pick up our non-safari luggage to store until we returned to Johannesburg. We had a bit of a snafu in that the cafe where we were supposed to meet had changed names but figured it out soon enough and Givemore arrived from ARH to fetch our bags. Mike had an English breakfast and I had an omelet and I was still fretting about the money situation. So we stopped off at Western Union to find out the details on wiring money from the US. We were assured this would not be a problem. It was now time to re-check our bags on South African Airways for our flight to Maun. We headed to our gate and passed some time again at another Mugg & Bean cafe. It was a lot of wait and wait and wait. Finally, our plane was ready to go. Since we were on a smaller plane, we were bused from the main terminal out to the tarmac. When we arrived to the plane, our assigned row of seats did not exist. Not knowing what to do, the flight attendants told us to sit in any vacant seat. So we sat in the front row, the only place where there were two seats together. Apparently this was "first class," although the only difference from the other seats seemed to be the meal that was served. This did not sit well with the lady behind us as she bitched and moaned the whole trip about it, even though they didn't serve us the "fancy" meal. We didn't care; we were so exhausted that we slept the short 1.5 hour flight anyway. We landed in Maun where we met our travel agent from Safari Specialists. I explained our money situation to her and gave her a head's up that my mother would be in contact. Then we boarded our final flight of the day, a four-seat plane piloted by Itor, and headed to Tau Pan in the Kalahari Desert.
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The runway on which we landed
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We landed safely and unloaded our gear. We were met by our guide, Vasco, and tracker, Souper.
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We stayed to make sure the runway was clear for Itor's take-off.
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We arrived at camp a few minutes later where we met the manager, Joseph, and had a quick camp orientation. Our "tent" was beautiful and the front deck and outdoor shower had a spectacular view over the waterhole.
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Walking from our cabin to the main dining building.
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Bar area in main building
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Public bathroom at main building
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Firepit and viewing deck from main building
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After a quick clean up, we headed out for a short, two hour game drive. At this camp we were paired with two, older Swiss ladies who spoke very little English but were as nice as they could be. They were excited and we all seemed to communicate effectively, even with the language barrier (our guide did not speak Swiss either).

The game drive started out with the smallest of creatures.
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And moved on to some bigger ones - kudu.
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Guineafowl - also known as the Kalahari chicken.
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Weaver nests.
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Wildebeest.
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Springbok.
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Bat-eared fox couple.
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Jackal approaching the bat-eared foxes.
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Squirrels.
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Cape Fox.
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Abandoned ostrich egg.
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Rabbit.
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Black Korhaan.
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Steenbok.
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Before stopping for sunset drinks, we did see an African wild cat but unfortunately, it was skittish and Mike scared it away. We headed back to camp and enjoyed a buffet dinner of spinach rolls, Thai-style chicken curry, mushroom chickpea curry, rice, butternut squash, broccoli, and bread pudding for dessert. Dinner at Tau Pan is communal with the guides and other guests. This evening we talked with five other guests from Finland. We spent some time around the campfire then enjoyed an outdoor shower, listening to the lions roar in the distance, hoping we would find them the next day. After a long day, we made it to bed around 12:30a.

Posted by zihuatcat 14:05 Archived in Botswana Tagged mike botswana pan kalahari tau Comments (0)

Dubai Layover 1: Desert Dunes and Dinner

I was finally returning to Africa! It had been only two years but it had seemed like forever. This time, instead of it being a girls' trip, it was my honeymoon. After twelve years, Mike and I got married just three days before leaving on our long-planned trip. It couldn't have been better timing.
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This trip was much different than the first. It was a three week journey with ten days of safari in Botswana, three nights on the South African coast, and five nights in Cape Town. On either end of the trip, we had long layovers in Dubai. The official itinerary looked like this:

Friday, November 20 - Fly to Dubai.
Saturday, November 21 - Arrive in Dubai. Long layover.
Sunday, November 22 - Arrive in Johannesburg. Fly to Maun, Botswana. Fly to the Kalahari Desert. Spend three nights at Tau Pan.
Wednesday, November 25 - Fly north to the Linyanti Region. Spend two nights at Lagoon Camp.
Friday, November 27 - Road transfer to Lebala Camp. Spend two nights.
Sunday, November 29 - Fly to the Okavango Delta. Spend three nights at Kwara Camp.
Wednesday, December 2 - Fly back to Maun then on to Johannesburg. Spend night at African Rock Hotel.
Thursday, December 3 - Fly to Cape Town. Drive to De Kelders. Spend three nights at Cliff Lodge.
Sunday, December 6 - Drive back to Cape Town. Spend five nights at Lawhill Luxury Apartments.
Friday, December 11 - Fly to Dubai.
Saturday, December 12 - Arrive in Dubai. Long layover.
Sunday, December 13 - Arrive home.

Our car arrived for airport pickup at 8a sharp. We were so excited that we hadn't gotten much sleep the night before. We arrived at the airport and had breakfast at Tigrin's Pub. Mike had bangers and mash and I had an American breakfast. We boarded the gigantic A380 for our 14-hour flight to Dubai. Our seats were toward the back of the plane, just in front of a bulkhead, near the toilet. Emirates supplied us with hot towels, socks, and eye covers. There was plenty of leg room, good food, and free drinks. I would say this was the most pleasant overseas plane trip I've been except for the constant shrieking of babies throughout the flight. Mike was able to sleep through most of it. I was not. After a dinner of chicken ragout for me and sweet and sour fish for Mike, I watched a foodie documentary and he watched "Minions." I then played "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" for a large portion of the flight. I got very, very close many times but never could clinch the win.

We arrived in Dubai around noon and made it through immigration with no issues. Our luggage was checked all the way through. Our first order of business was to find an ATM and get some UAE dirhams. Unfortunately, my debit card was rejected and I couldn't retrieve any cash. I didn't know why and since it was a Saturday, my bank was closed. I had some US cash so I changed some of that into dirhams and decided to deal with the cash issue later. We took a taxi to the Souk al Bahar, a shopping center connected to the Dubai Mall. We stopped for lunch at Mango Tree, a Thai restaurant with a tableside view of the afternoon fountain show and the Burj Khalifa.
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We dined on prawn chips with sweet and sour sauce and shrimp spring rolls while watching tourists zipline across the fountains in front of the Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world.
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We relaxed at Mango Tree until around 3p then walked down to Guest Services at the Souk to meet our guide for our dune bashing safari and dinner in the desert. Anil met us there shortly and after a short stop for gas we set out for the dunes. We drove about 45 minutes outside of town.
Anil stopped so we could take some pictures and he could deflate the tires.
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Then the dune bashing began. I didn't really know what to expect with dune bashing. I knew we'd be driving over the dunes but I didn't expect we'd be doing it at break-neck speed and turning and spinning. It was a little scary and I didn't care much for it to be honest. We were sideways and all over the place. I thought we were going to flip over several times.
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After only about 15 minutes, Anil miscalculated and we got stuck. Our back right tire was deeply embedded in the sand and our front left tire was completely off the ground. We weren't going anywhere. He had us get out of the car so he could inspect the situation.
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He made some phone calls. He paced around. He pulled out a shovel. I use the term shovel loosely. It was actually a kid's play sand, beach shovel. There was no way we were going to dig out with that. We could see other cars driving in the distance but had no way of signalling to them. Mike and I paced around and tried to enjoy the scenery.
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Finally, help showed up to pull us out.
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And there was a cavalry behind them. Mike and I just tried not to get run over.
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Shortly we were on our way again. I was totally over the dune bashing and quite frankly didn't have a lot of confidence in Anil's driving capabilities at this point. But he was on a mission to show us a good time.
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Thankfully, the sun was starting to set so the dune bashing didn't last much longer. We pulled over to get some last pictures before dark.
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Anil then drove us to the desert camp for our dinner and show. It was a beautiful, candlelit camp set up in the middle of the desert. The camp had a full bar and offered henna tattoos, sand boarding, camel riding, and traditional robing. We chose a table near the stage and grabbed some drinks.
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Before dinner, Mike really wanted to try on the traditional dress of the UAE. I was not excited about this and thought it might be disrespectful to do so. I also did not want to take part in the oppression of women that I believe the traditional dress supports. But I relented and we wandered over to the tent to take a look. We did put on the traditional robes and seeing a picture of myself in this garb was an eye-opening experience for me. It makes me thankful that I was born in a country where I can enjoy full equal rights.
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The pre-dinner show was a tanoura dance from Egypt. The word tanoura refers to the colorful skirt worn by the dancer.
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After the show, a buffet dinner was served of beef and chicken kebabs, aromatic rice, salads, and Indian flatbread. Mike bought a traditional headwrap which he wore the rest of the night.
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The after dinner show was a belly dancing performance which, according to Anil, is not traditional in any way to the UAE but is performed for the Westerners only. There was a little boy whom she would dance over to and he would giggle and smile shyly. This was cute. The older, salivating men who acted like they hadn't seen a woman dance before were not.
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Anil arrived after the show and drove us back to the airport. He showed Mike the proper way to tie on his headwrap but when we went through immigration at the airport it was obvious that the men there were talking disapprovingly about Mike wearing it. Anil had said it would be okay. It was obviously not so Mike removed it so as not to cause a problem.

We didn't have a lot of time to kill at the airport but we did stop by the duty free shop on our way to the gate and my debit card was again rejected. This time, the manager said that VISA was telling him to confiscate it and cut it up. I was almost in tears by now as we had very little cash and I was depending on the ability to ATM money during our entire trip. We were about to head to Botswana for ten days where we would have no access to phones or email so I had no way to contact my bank or resolve the issue. I convinced the manager NOT to cut up my card and was able to pay for our items with another card. I came up with a plan and made a quick phone call to my mother asking her to Western Union some cash to us to arrive in Johannesburg in ten days. She would have to coordinate with our Botswana travel agent while we were on safari. She agreed and we boarded the flight.

With almost two days of very little sleep, we were both asleep before take off. Mike woke up just long enough to see the Burj Khalifa lit up as we soared overhead. We woke again for some beef in tomato sauce for dinner and then played "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" together for a while. We drifted off to sleep again and enjoyed a very quiet flight all the way to Johannesburg.

Posted by zihuatcat 16:50 Archived in United Arab Emirates Tagged dubai mike layover Comments (0)

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